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Technology – Advanced Eye Care

Custom Eyes Optometry uses the most up-to-date technology to ensure the best eye care possible. Here are some of the different types of tests and equipment you may experience on a visit.

3D OCT-1 Maestro

A comprehensive OCT platform that gives you retinal, optic nerve and anterior segment imaging capabilities as well as beautiful fundus and anterior eye images with extensive tonal range

3.5V Standard Ophthalmoscope

Used for inspecting the retina and other parts of the eye.

Humphrey 740

The Humphrey Visual Field HFA 740 is loaded with features including 19 test patterns, and user designed custom testing capabilities with a testing range out to 90 degrees. Includes an integrated hard drive, eliminating the need for an external computer. The Zeiss 740 also offers SITA, the expert operating system, as an optional feature; however, the Zeiss 740 does include FastPac software as a standard feature, reducing testing time by 40%. Also offers Multiple StatPac Analysis Software test results, which can be printed to compare Visual Field progression over time. Additional features on the Humphrey Visual Field HFA 740 include Full threshold testing, stimulus sizes from Goldman I-V, and stimulus colors in Red or Blue on White are included. The Zeiss 740 Perimeter also includes a VGA monitor hook up for external viewing of test results. The Humphrey Visual Field HFA 740 is a very reliable, yet affordable visual field. The 740 performs most tests flawlessly and at at an acceptable speed. Our units are sold fully refurbished, inspected and upgraded. Our visual fields are also sold with the Zeiss power table with integrated printer. The Humphrey 740 perimeter includes 19 test patterns, user designed custom testing capability with a testing range out to 90 degrees. A 1.1GB hard disk storage is provided, eliminating the need for an external computer. SITA, the expert operating system, is an optional feature on the model Humphrey 740.

Phoropter 11625

This Minus Cylinder Phoropter is model 11625 and is among the best in the industry. Our units are carefully removed, tested, cleaned and prepared for resale. All optics look great and condition is excellent.

Professional Ophthalmoscope

Used for inspecting the retina and other parts of the eye.

Professional Retinoscope

Retinoscopes shine light into the patient's eye, observes the reflection (reflex) off the patient's retina, and measures the refractive error.

Slit Lamp BC-900

The profitableness of Haag Streit BC 900 is hard to underestimate. In a few words, this is a slit lamp combined with a low-duty microscope. It is widely used in optics and ophthalmology.

TX-F Non-Contact Tonometer

Non-contact tonometer whose totally automated operation results in error-free ocular pressure measurements

Topcon KR-8000PA Autorefractor/ Keratometer

The new tri-functional KR-8000PA SUPRA Auto Refractor / Keratometer / Topographer combines an auto-refractor, an auto-keratometer, and a computerized color corneal mapping system all in a single, compact unit! This enables the instrument to provide three times the diagnostic capabilities in one-third the space, at a fraction of the cost of the individual instruments. By implementing the Topcon exclusive rotary prism technology for the refraction portion of the measurement, the KR-8000PA provides objective data that is unmatched in accuracy and reliability. Auto tracking and auto measurement enhance the ease of operation. The unit also incorporates ten Placido rings for enhanced testing precision, providing corneal mapping measurements out to 10mm!

A800 Applanation Tonometer

Non-contact tonometer whose totally automated operation results in error-free ocular pressure measurements

 

Comprehensive Eye Exams

Eye Exams For the Whole Family

Eye Exam for adults children family

Routine eye exams are important, regardless of your age or physical health. During a complete eye exam, your eye doctor will not only determine your prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses, but will also check your eyes for common eye diseases, assess how your eyes work together as a team and evaluate your eyes as an indicator of your overall health.

Need an Eye Exam to Update Your Prescription?

A comprehensive eye exam includes a number of tests and procedures to examine and evaluate the health of your eyes and the quality of your vision. These tests range from simple ones, like having you read an eye chart, to complex tests, such as using digital retinal imaging technology to evaluate retinal health.

The Eye Care experts at Custom Eyes Optometry recommend you have a complete eye exam every year to assess your risk for potentially damaging eye conditions, as well as to keep on top of any changes in vision you may be experiencing.

Eye Care for Everyone in Costa Mesa

How Often Do You Need to See the Optometrist, Based on Age?

The AOA recommends an annual eye exam for any patient who wears eyeglasses or contacts. If you don’t normally need vision correction, you still need an eye exam every year. Doctors often recommend more frequent eye examinations for people with diabetes, high blood pressure and other disorders, because many diseases can have an impact on vision and eye health.

Since the risk of eye disease continues to increase with advancing age, everyone over the age of 60 should be examined annually.

If you are over 40, it’s a good idea to have your eyes examined every one to two years to check for common age-related eye problems such as presbyopia, cataracts and macular degeneration.

Eye Exams for Children

Some experts estimate that approximately 5% to 10% of pre-schoolers and 25% of school-aged children have vision problems. According to the American Optometric Association (AOA), all children should have their eyes examined at 6 months of age, at age 3 and again at the start of school. Children without vision problems or risk factors for eye or vision problems should then continue to have their eyes examined at every year throughout school.

Children with existing vision problems or risk factors should have their eyes examined more frequently. Common risk factors for vision problems include:

  • premature birth
  • developmental delays
  • turned or crossed eyes
  • family history of eye disease
  • history of eye injury
  • other physical illness or disease

The AOA recommends that children who wear eyeglasses or contact lenses should have their eyes examined at least every 12 months or according to their optometrist’s instructions. Read more about Pediatric Eye Exams.

Schedule an Eye Doctor’s Appointment

Contact our eye care clinic to schedule an eye exam near you, today.

What to Expect From Your Eye Exam

Preparing for Your Eye Exam

woman wearing glasses reading before an eye doctor's appointment

You might be going to a regularly-scheduled eye exam. You may be following a recommendation to see an optometrist after a vision screening at a local clinic or wellness center. Or your next eye doctor visit could be a response to vision problems or eye discomfort.

The more you know going in, the easier the entire vision care process will be.

For regularly scheduled eye exams, expect to talk about any changes in your medical history since the last time you saw your eye doctor. And if this is your first time in a new practice, you’ll be asked to provide a more complete medical history, including a list of medications you’re currently taking, and any vision problems your parents may have experienced.

In addition, you’ll undergo a series of vision and eye tests that help determine the overall health and quality of your vision. These tests also help to check that your current prescription glasses or contacts (if you have one) is still meeting your vision needs. Your optometrist will also check your eyes for signs of any potential vision problems or eye diseases. In many instances, your pupil may be dilated (opened) using special drops so that your eye doctor can better see the structures of the eye.

You’ll then have an honest discussion about the current state of your eye health and vision, and your eye doctor may prescribe vision correction for you in the form of eyeglasses or contact lenses. Any health concerns or possibly serious vision complications will also be discussed, including the next steps you must take to preserve and protect your sight.

How Long Is a Vision Test?

In general, a routine eye exam will last less than an hour depending upon the number of tests you have, and may be partially or completely covered by many vision insurance plans.

Visiting eye doctors as a result of a vision screening is also common, but remember: vision screenings offered by health clinics, pediatricians, public schools or local charitable organizations are not a substitute for comprehensive eye exams. Be sure to bring the findings from your screening to your eye doctor—it’s a great way to begin the discussion of your current eye health.

For eye doctor visits that result from eye pain, eye discomfort or vision problems you actually can see, expect to take many of the steps involved in a routine eye exam, but specific to the symptoms you’re having. There may be a number of additional tests required as well, so it’s important—especially when suffering pain or discomfort—to allow for as much time as possible for a complete, comprehensive eye exam.

And if you feel you are in an emergency situation with your eyes or your vision—don’t wait. Seek immediate emergency medical treatment.

What to Remember For The Eye Doctor’s Appointment

Many vision problems and eye diseases often present minimal, if any, symptoms. That’s why it’s so important to make regular appointments to see your eye doctor. And since vision can change gradually over time, it’s important to know that you’re seeing your best, year after year.

Remember the following for your next eye doctor visit:

  • Know your medical history and list of current medications
  • Know your current symptoms and be able to describe them—write them down if necessary
  • Know your family history—some eye diseases like glaucoma and cataracts are hereditary
  • Ask in advance about your particular vision insurance plan, and if a co-pay will be due
  • Bring your insurance card, identification and method of payment, if necessary
  • Bring your most recent prescription for glasses or contact lenses
  • Bring your corrective eyewear to the exam
  • If undergoing a test using dilation eye drops, bring proper eye protection, like sunglasses, for after your appointment

Most importantly, remember that eye doctors — and everyone within the eye care practice — are there to help you see your best and feel your best.

Special thanks to the Eyeglass Guide, for information material that aided in the creation of this website.

You can contact Custom Eyes Optometry at your convenience to schedule your next eye doctor’s appointment.